brain

New Study Reveals Why Your Brain Chooses Junk Food Over More Nutritious Options

This study suggests that it is the speed of our cognitive processing, rather than mere willpower, that influences our food choices (via LSE). People are more likely to choose something delicious, even if it is unhealthy, because they can determine very quickly that the food item will taste good. It simply takes longer for our brains to process the fact that a food is healthy. Very often, we might start to snack on an unhealthy treat, before information about its healthfulness even has time to enter our minds.

“Our findings suggest that it is often not our fault that

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Brain Training App Helps Users Cut Down on Junk Food

Using a brain-training app helps people eat less junk food and lose weight, new research suggests.

The Food Trainer (FoodT app) trains people to tap on images of healthy foods – but to stop when they see unhealthy snacks, creating an association between these foods and stopping.

The new study, by the universities of Exeter and Helsinki, found that playing the game about once a day for a month led to an average one-point reduction of junk food consumption on an eight-point scale (the scale ranges from four or more items per day, to one or zero items per

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This Is Your Brain on Junk Food: In ‘Hooked,’ Michael Moss Explores Addiction

But no addictive drug can fire up the reward circuitry in our brains as rapidly as our favorite foods, Mr. Moss writes. “The smoke from cigarettes takes 10 seconds to stir the brain, but a touch of sugar on the tongue will do so in a little more than a half second, or six hundred milliseconds, to be precise,” he writes. “That’s nearly 20 times faster than cigarettes.”

This puts the term “fast food” in a new light. “Measured in milliseconds, and the power to addict, nothing is faster than processed food in rousing the brain,” he added.

Mr. Moss

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Study shows how drinking coffee changes brain connectivity | FOX 4 Kansas City WDAF-TV

It may not surprise you that coffee drinking can improve alertness, but a new study found that caffeine and the popular beverage may have other positive effects when it comes to the brain’s functions.

Researchers from the University of Minho School of Medicine in Portugal conducted the study, which was sponsored by the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC) and published in “Molecular Psychiatry.”

The research team, led by School of Medicine President Nuno Sousa, used functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) technology to compare brain activity of coffee drinkers to non-coffee drinkers while they were resting, performing a task and

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